Category Archives: Mistery

TERRIFYING PLACES ON THE INTERNET THAT WILL STEAL YOUR SLEEP FOREVER

 

13 Terrifying Places on The Internet That Will Steal Your Sleep Forever

They say that the internet that is visible to our eyes is only 5% of the entire network: a tip of the iceberg. The remaining 95% is a place you would never, in your wildest dreams, want to find yourself. Also known as the Deep Web, this almost invisible web surface cannot be accessed through the usual search engines like Chrome, Safari or Firefox, and harbors the most grotesque, deranged and despicable things known to mankind. Those that are capable of making your blood curdle and sending chills down your spine. Active drug markets, child pornography, human experimentation, red rooms and cannibal forums. Everything and anything is possible on the Deep Web. Following are some of the many horrifying things users have found on the Deep Web, those that still haunt them every single night.

1. How to Cook a Woman

While there have been many reports of forums full of people swapping tips on having humans for lunch. But perhaps the most chilling is the one lucky individual who stumbled upon a detailed guide on how to butcher and properly cook women. This page had information on what body types to use for specific cuts, how to prepare these cuts, and how to cook the girl so she lives as long as possible. It horrifies me that people way worse than the freaks on Criminal Minds exist.

2. Stillborn Babies Collection

A deep web user happened to stumble upon a forum where mothers shared photos of their stillborn babies. It is a site for women who can’t deal with the fact that their babies had been stillborn. It was filled with pictures of dead fetuses dressed up and had this really sad, creepy song playing as you scrolled through. I don’t think a forum could get more depressing and creepier than that!

 

3. Human Leather

Yes, that’s right: HUMAN LEATHER! This website is filled with products made from human flesh like food, wallets, belts, etc. If you fancy products made out of human skin, what am I saying, of course we all do! If you understood I was being sarcastic then good for you, if you didn’t then this site is probably for you!

4. Living Sex Dolls

This deep web story is sick and disturbing.  It is not for the faint-hearted.  If you are a sensitive person, you should stop reading right here. Continue at your own risk.

It is believed that a surgeon living in Easter Europe sold something peculiar on the Dark Web: Live Sex Dolls. He would adopt several young girls between the ages of 6-18 from a local orphanage that was happy to get rid of any extra mouths to feed. He would then take them home and surgically remove all of their limbs and sexually torture them.

The girls were only fed from a bottle minimum, their teeth were removed and a rubber was inserted in their mouths to maintain beauty and to assist with fellatio. The girls were then physically and mentally abused to turn them into unquestioning, unfeeling slaves. They were electrocuted, their genitals were sliced and were beaten regularly by the surgeon. The doctor destroyed their sense of hearing by playing extremely loud music and sounds on headphones, and used laser to blind the girls.  Almost all of their senses were destroyed to make them more docile. He tortured them for months preparing them for their new owner before they were ready to be sold for $40000 on the Dark Web!

5. Dead Girls

Well this is one disturbing site the does exactly what it says on the tin, lots and lots of photos of dead girls. The site is supposed to be full of photos of girls ranging from 5 to 16, all dead from various ways and means. While that’s just morbid there are a number of creepypasta stories surrounding the site and the subsequent madness that followed with seeing all those dead girls.

6. Hitmen for Hire

Yes, there are websites on the Dark Web that offer Hitmen for hire. These websites also post pictures as proof that these guys actually mean business. Getting someone killed is as you expect not cheap but from the looks of it, they’ll get the job done.

7. IRL Cannibal Forums

What may sound like Hannibal or Silence of The Lamb fan forums, are actually real life cannibal forums about eating people and being eaten by people. Some members even chat and arrange meetups there to eat each other like, “I need someone to eat my fresh meat. I am juicy and tender.” And all that crazy shit.

8. Child Pornography

Of the most deranged things found on the Deep and Dark Web, child abuse seems to be the most prevalent. Although many of these websites have been shut down by the authorities, there still remain an array of predators and pedophiles operating anonymously on the Deep Web.

9. Human Experimentation

This unholy creep fest is a room on the deep web. The guys who run this site believe that not all humans are equal, and to prove their point they find homeless people and perform dark and possibly painful experiments on them, similar to the likes of the Japanese unit 731 that existed during World War II. Experiments range from water/fluid restriction, injecting pregnant women with bleach, starvation, radiation exposure and even sterilization. Fake or not, it is bone-chilling and some of the experiments that were documented were creepy. Yep, told you it was a sick place.

10. Summoning Demons

Don’t think you’re having enough fun at your regular party? Worry no more, you can go ahead and summon a demon and get that party going! Yeah, but jokes aside, very creepy!

11. Drug Markets

Perhaps the most famous thing about the deep web is the fact that you can get every and any drug ever made. Ranging from premium quality marijuana to pills and acid, the Deep Web is laden with websites that engage in the sale of drugs. ‘The Silkroad’ was a very popular and the most credible source for some fine bud or anything else until it got taken down very recently.

12. Professional hackers, Fake ID’s and Credit Card Fraudulence

There is a whole bunch of sites where you can find people to hack anything for you, be it is your ex’s account or a top secret government website. These guys are up for anything. The deep web is also home to anonymous sellers who advertise their goods on topic-specific forums like copied credit cards on a credit card fraud board. Apart from forging credit cards, people can also purchase fake identification too. An American passport could cost you around 700 Euros, or 973.91 USD.

13. Red Rooms/ Live Torture Streams

While the existence of such rooms has not been proven as of yet, people have repeatedly claimed to have found terrifying live streams. Some guy stumbled on a live stream where a girl was sitting in a chair and commanded people from a chat window to tell her what kind of abuse she should do to herself. After many cuts, bruises, eye gouging, the girl eventually killed herself on the live stream.

This is not the only case where people have brought harm to themselves on a live stream on the deep web. These live streams are popularly known as “Red Rooms”: a place even ISIS is believed to have started using as a platform to conduct beheadings and murder.

THE CREEPIEST GHOST AND MONSTER STORIES AROUND THE WORLD

The popobawa is a shape-shifting demon that stalks the Tanzanian island of Pemba.

It’s Halloween — a time for Frankenstein monsters and vampires and werewolves. But many of us have our own monsters from different cultures, and when we threw out a call to our readers asking what ghost stories and folktales they grew up with in their own traditions, we got back stories of creatures stalking the shadows of Latin American hallways and vengeful demons from South Asia with backwards feet. (And that’s before we get to the were-hyenas and the infernal bathroom stalls.) Below are some of the best we’ve found or that were told to us from Code Switch readers.

Read on…if you dare.

The Night Demon

An evil creature stalks the Tanzanian island of Pemba in the Indian Ocean. It can change shape — a bat sometimes, a human-like form at others. It prefers to come out at night, but some say they have seen it during the day. The popobawa — “bat-wing” in Swahili — is indiscriminate in its targets. But in a common retelling, the spirit.

The popobawa story is rather new — only dating back a few decades from a time of civil unrest following the assassination of the country’s president. The popular thinking goes that after a popbawa attack, victims must spread the word to others on Pemba. Otherwise, they will continue to be visited by the popobawa.

Reports of attack send some locals into a panic. A few years ago, a series of night-time sexual assaults were blamed on the popobawa.

“Some men are staying awake or sleeping in groups outside their homes,” the BBC reported in 2007. “Others are smearing themselves with pig’s oil, believing this repels attacks.”

A peasant farmer named Mjaka Hamad claims popobawahe was attacked by the  in 1997.

I couldn’t see it. I could only feel it. But some people in my house could see it. Those who’ve got the spirits in their heads could see it. Everybody was terrified. They were outside screaming Huyo! It means the Popobawa is there. I had this bad pain in my ribs where it crushed me. I don’t believe in spirits so maybe that’s why it attacked me. Maybe it will attack anybody who doesn’t believe.

Beware the third stall.

Beware the third stall.

The Girl In The Bathroom

In Japan, the schools contain an infernal secret. If you go into the girl’s bathroom on the third floor of the building, and walk to the third stall, you might find her.

“You have to knock 3 times and call her name,” a Code Switch reader named Jessic tweeted at us. “When you open the stall door, a little girl in a red skirt will be there.”

The little girl with the bob haircut is Hanako-san. She wants friends to play with, maybe. Or perhaps she wants to drag you to Hell — through the toilet.

“Depending on which part of Japan you live in, she may have a bloody hand and grab you, or be a lizard that devours you,” Jessica said. “Although I am getting scared just thinking about her right now.”

Hanako-san has become a fixture of Japanese urban folklore over the last 70 years. The most popular origin story for the tale holds that during World War II, a schoolgirl was using the bathroom when a bomb fell on top of the building. The school collapsed on top of Hanako-san, who has been trapped there ever since.

But Hanako isn’t the only schoolgirl who haunts Japan’s school bathrooms. Kashima Reiko, another young girl, was said to have been cut in half by a train. Now her disfigured spirit inhabits bathrooms, asking children who enter the stalls where her legs are. The legend goes that if Kashima Reiko is not satisfied with their answer, she will rip their legs off.

The Woman Of Your (Worst) Dreams

In Brazil, a tall, skinny woman with long yellow fingernails and red eyes creeps along the rooftops, and watches families inside of their homes. She watches them as they sit at the table for dinner. She watches them while they eat. La pisadeira.

After the meal, when someone goes to sleep on a full stomach, la pisadeira sneaks into their bedroom. Then she sits on their chest so that they cannot move. The pisadeira that has attacked them watches them as they begin to panic — the victim’s eyes partly open, but they’re neither fully asleep or fully awake — helpless and trapped in a body that won’t move.

Sleep paralysis is a well-studied disorder. “The worst thing is when you try to fight or call for help,” a Redditor said in a conversation about what the experiences with it were like. “Your voice doesn’t work and your body will not respond. You just feel helpless.”

And among those who suffer from it across many cultures, there is one, unsettling common experience — a sense that a malevolent force is hovering over them in their immobile stat.

“The earliest one I can remember is with my mother in the room and she’s sitting on my bed, her face morphs into a demon like thing,” a Redditor shared in a thread on sleep paralysis. Or: “A large dark figure, kind of a human silhouette, emerging from the foot of my bed and staring down at me.”

(Could her “mom” or the silhouette have be a pisadeira?)

They went on. “Ugh, I need to stop trying to remember these things. I’m getting chills.”

The Weeping Woman

Her name was Maria. She lived in Mexico. She had long, dark hair and a covetous heart. The man she loved would not have her, so she took her children in a fit of rage, took them down to the river, and drowned them, one by one. When the man she loved spurned her again, she realized what she’d done. She took herself to the water and threw herself in, to subject herself to the same fate as her children. But heaven would not have Maria, and she was condemned to wander the world in perpetual grief. She is La Llorona — the wailing woman.

The people who have seen her said they can her walking, soaking wet, wearing all white. And she can be heard crying out for the little ones she killed. “Ay, mis hijos!” she weeps. (“Oh, my children!”) Some say that she snatches other young children as she walks, mistaking them for her own young children she knew.

“¡Ay, mis hijos!”

Children along the Mexican border grow up with her story, which traces itself to stories about several different female spirit of the Aztec empire.

“My earliest memory [of her] is being in elementary school and being in the girl’s bathroom,” says Terry Martinez, who grew up in Texas in the Rio Grande Valley. She and the other young children would try to summon La Llorona in a bathroom mirror.

“The lights had to be out,” Martinez says. “The door had to be closed.”

They’d splash water on the mirror and say her name three times.

La Llorona. La Llorona. La Llorona.

“It was just seeing who could stand being in the darkroom and seeing how long we could stand there waiting for her to come out of the sink,” Martinez said. “It usually ended with a bunch of little girls screaming and running out of the bathroom.

STOP MARKETERS, PHONE HACKERS, AND UNKNOWN CALLS

How to Check If a Phone Number Is Real

How to Check If a Phone Number Is Real

Sarah Li Cain
March 19, 2020
Ever receive a phone call from an unknown number and wonder whether you should answer it? With number spoofing and robocalls on the rise, it’s getting harder for consumers to know when a call is from a legitimate person or business. This means learning how to check if a phone number is real may help you better figure out whether to answer your phone the next time you get a call from an unknown caller.

The rise of ‘fake’ phone numbers
More telemarketers and fraudsters use techniques such as caller ID spoofing to mask their number. That way, it appears as though the call is from a local number, making it all the more likely you might be tempted to pick up.

“The goal is for you to listen to their scam with the hope you’ll become their next victim,” said Mark McCoy, director or Reverd, a spam call complaint app. “Sadly, the scammer is able to earn a decent wage this way.”

Unfortunately, robocallers and nuisance phone calls are already a major problem in the U.S. First Orion, a network enterprise company, estimates that consumers and businesses get more than 100 billion unwanted calls from scammers every year. That doesn’t include an additional 30 billion calls from telemarketers. In fact, the company predicts nearly 50% of phone calls consumers receive this year will be fraudulent.

In many cases, nuisance phone calls waste a few minutes of your time, but for others it can result in a loss of money. According to the Federal Trade Commission, consumers reported losses totaling $1.48 billion in 2018 to fraud (though not all were attributed to robocallers).

In one recent case, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) fined Florida resident Adrian Abramovich $120 million for making nearly 100 million robocalls to advertise fraudulent vacations and timeshares.

But there is little the FCC can do to combat international robocallers and scammers who target U.S. consumers.

How to try and find out if a phone number is from a real person
Stopping scam calls may not be possible, but you can lessen the number of unwanted calls by not answering calls from unknown numbers. There are also ways you can check to try to see if the phone number is real before deciding whether to return the call.

Look it up on social media. Many businesses will have an active social media profile. For example, a company’s Facebook page will likely include an address and phone number. At the very least, you should be able to see the business’s website to better determine whether it looks legitimate.
Use an online search engine. Sometimes an online search may yield the results you’re looking for. If it’s a legitimate phone number, the name of the business will usually show up as the first result in a Google search.
Conduct a reverse phone lookup. When you enter an unknown phone number into a reverse phone lookup tool, the service will try to find the person and any other details associated with that number. If no results turn up, that could be a sign the number is spoofed.
Download an app. There are legitimate apps for both Android and iPhone you can use to help reveal an incoming phone number. Unlike caller ID, these apps usually display the type of phone number (landline or cellphone) and whether the number is likely from a spam caller.
Use a phone validator. This tool allows you to type in a phone number to see how likely it is a spam caller. In some cases, you may be able to see additional details, such as the location and name that’s associated with the phone number.
The bottom line
While robocallers and phone scammers aren’t going away anytime soon, there are tools and services you can use to better combat nuisance callers. And if you do find yourself on the receiving end of a suspicious call asking for money or personal information, simply hang up and don’t give the caller any details.

March 19, 2020

Ever receive a phone call from an unknown number and wonder whether you should answer it? With number spoofing and robocalls on the rise, it’s getting harder for consumers to know when a call is from a legitimate person or business. This means learning how to check if a phone number is real may help you better figure out whether to answer your phone the next time you get a call from an unknown caller.

The rise of ‘fake’ phone numbers

More telemarketers and fraudsters use techniques such as caller ID spoofing to mask their number. That way, it appears as though the call is from a local number, making it all the more likely you might be tempted to pick up.

“The goal is for you to listen to their scam with the hope you’ll become their next victim,” said Mark McCoy, director or Reverd, a spam call complaint app. “Sadly, the scammer is able to earn a decent wage this way.”

Unfortunately, robocallersand nuisance phone calls are already a major problem in the U.S. First Orion, a network enterprise company, estimates that consumers and businesses get more than 100 billion unwanted calls from scammers every year. That doesn’t include an additional 30 billion calls from telemarketers. In fact, the company predicts nearly 50% of phone calls consumers receive this year will be fraudulent.

In many cases, nuisance phone calls waste a few minutes of your time, but for others it can result in a loss of money. According to the Federal Trade Commission, consumers reported losses totaling $1.48 billion in 2018 to fraud (though not all were attributed to robocallers).

In one recent case, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) fined Florida resident Adrian Abramovich $120 million for making nearly 100 million robocalls to advertise fraudulent vacations and timeshares.

But there is little the FCC can do to combat international robocallers and scammers who target U.S. consumers.

How to try and find out if a phone number is from a real person

Stopping scam calls may not be possible, but you can lessen the number of unwanted calls by not answering calls from unknown numbers. There are also ways you can check to try to see if the phone number is real before deciding whether to return the call.

  • Look it up on social media. Many businesses will have an active social media profile. For example, a company’s Facebook page will likely include an address and phone number. At the very least, you should be able to see the business’s website to better determine whether it looks legitimate.
  • Use an online search engine. Sometimes an online search may yield the results you’re looking for. If it’s a legitimate phone number, the name of the business will usually show up as the first result in a Google search.
  • Conduct a reverse phone lookup. When you enter an unknown phone number into a reverse phone lookup tool, the service will try to find the person and any other details associated with that number. If no results turn up, that could be a sign the number is spoofed.
  • Download an app. There are legitimate apps for both Android and iPhone you can use to help reveal an incoming phone number. Unlike caller ID, these apps usually display the type of phone number (landline or cellphone) and whether the number is likely from a spam caller.
  • Use a **phone validator**. This tool allows you to type in a phone number to see how likely it is a spam caller. In some cases, you may be able to see additional details, such as the location and name that’s associated with the phone number.

The bottom line

While robocallers and phone scammers aren’t going away anytime soon, there are tools and services you can use to better combat nuisance callers. And if you do find yourself on the receiving end of a suspicious call asking for money or personal information, simply hang up and don’t give the caller any details.

WHAT WE DON’T KNOW ABOUT THE CORONAVIRUS

BBC NEWS

By James Gallagher Health and science correspondent.

Marh 29 2020


It feels like an eternity ago, but the world only became aware of the coronavirus in December.

Despite incredible efforts by scientists around the world, there is still much we do not understand, and we are all now part of a planet-wide experiment trying to find answers.

Here are some of the big outstanding questions.

1. How many people have been infected.

It is one of the most basic questions, but also one of the most crucial.

There have been hundreds of thousands of confirmed cases around the world, but this is only a fraction of the total number of infections. And the figures are further confused by an unknown number of asymptomatic cases – people who have the virus but don’t feel ill.

Developing an antibody test will allow researchers to see whether anyone has had the virus. Only then will we understand how far or how easily the coronavirus is spreading.

2. How deadly it really is.

Until we know how many cases there have been, it is impossible to be certain of the death rate. At the moment the estimate is that around 1% of people infected with the virus die. But if there are large numbers of asymptomatic patients, the death rate could be lower.

3. The full range of symptoms.

The main symptoms of coronavirus are a fever and a dry cough – these are the ones you should be on the look out for.

A sore throat, headache and diarrhoea have also been reported in some cases and there is mounting speculation that a loss of sense of smell may affect some.

But the most important question is whether mild, cold-like symptoms, such as a runny nose or sneezing, are present in some patients.

Studies have suggested this is a possibility and that people could potentially be infectious without knowing they are carrying the virus.

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4. The role children play in spreading it.

Children can definitely catch coronavirus. However, they mostly develop mild symptoms and there are relatively few deaths among children compared with other age groups.

Children are normally super-spreaders of disease, partly because they mix with lots of people (often in the playground), but with this virus, it is not clear to what extent they help spread it.

5. Where exactly it came from.

The virus emerged in Wuhan, China, at the end of 2019, where there was a cluster of cases at an animal market.

The coronavirus, officially called Sars-CoV-2, is closely related to viruses that infect bats, however it is thought the virus was passed from bats to a mystery animal species that then passed it on to people.

That “missing link” remains unknown, and could be a source of further infections.

6. Whether there will be fewer cases in summer.

Colds and flu are more common in the winter months than in the summer, but it is not yet known whether the warmer weather will alter the spread of the virus.

The UK government’s scientific advisers have warned it is unclear whether there will be a seasonal effect. If there is one, they think it is likely to be smaller than that for colds and flu.

If there is a major dip in coronavirus over the summer, there is a danger that cases will spike in winter, when hospitals are also having to deal with an influx of patients with the usual winter bugs.

7. Why some people get much more severe symptoms.

Covid-19 is a mild infection for most. However around 20% go on to develop more severe disease, but why?

The state of a person’s immune system seems to be part of the issue, and there may be some genetic factor too. Understanding this could lead to ways of preventing people from needing intensive care.

8. How long immunity lasts, and whether you can get it twice.

There has been much speculation but little evidence on how durable any immunity to the virus is.

Patients must have built up an immune response, if they successfully fight off the virus. But as the disease has been around for only a few months there is a lack of long-term data. Rumours of patients being infected twice may be down to tests incorrectly saying they were free of the virus.

The question of immunity is vital for understanding what will happen in the long term.

9. Whether the virus will mutate.

Viruses mutate all the time, but most alterations to their genetic code do not make a significant difference.

As a general rule, you expect viruses to evolve to be less deadly in the long run, but this is not guaranteed.

The concern is that if the virus mutates, then the immune system no longer recognises it and a specific vaccine no longer works (as happens with flu)